Screenings


Venues and Admissions

Please see listings for screening location information and admission prices.

Programming: Beckie Stocchetti

 

 

Upcoming Screenings

 

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Friday, September 26, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde

     

    Buy Tickets Here!

     

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Saturday, September 27, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde



    Buy Tickets Here! 

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Wednesday, October 1, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde

     

    Buy Tickets Here! 

     

     

     

  • Programmed for My Barbarian exhibit at UIC!
    Free! (1966-2014, approx. 60 min., 16mm and video)
    Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - 7:00pm
    Location: Gallery 400, University of Illinois, Chicago - 400 South Peoria Street

     

    Inspired by Los Angeles art collective My Barbarian's explorations of feminist legacies, maternal symbolism, and their own roles as cultural producers, the films and videos in Half Suffocated star shaken sons, dazed daughters, multifarious moms, and a Brechtian lightbulb that shines a light on it all. Interruptions abound via stuttering motion, graceful repetitions, and shocks to the surface. Separated by decades, intents, and methods, these works clash and spark to illuminate the richness of ideas on display in the gallery.

    Martin Arnold: ALONE: LIFE WASTES ANDY HARDY (1998, 15 min., 16mm) 

    Marjorie Keller: DAUGHTERS OF CHAOS (1980, 20 min., 16mm on dvd) 

    Kera MacKenzie & Andrew Mausert-Mooney: IN A PERFECT FEVER (2014, video) 

    Malcolm Le Grice: CASTLE 1 (1966, 20 min., 16mm with light bulb) 

    FREE!

  • Co-Presented with Chicago Cinema Society!
    (2013, 115 min., video)
    Saturday, October 11, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers - 5243 North Clark Street

    METRO MANILA casts an illuminating gaze on the struggles of migrant families treading water amidst the dark underbelly of Filipino mean streets. It’s a riveting human drama and one of the most realistic and tense crime films in recent years. Oscar-nominated director/co-writer Sean Ellis (THE BROKEN), a U.K. national shooting on unfamiliar ground with the most uncanny naturalism and ease, pulls you intimately into his characters’ plights from the opening beats and never lets you go. His direction is perfect — and brilliantly put together — always one step ahead of the audience, twisting things off into places most unexpected with an agility that will amaze you. It’s phenomenal filmmaking." "It is a film that explores both the moral compromises forced by poverty and the cutthroat social dynamics that make bad choices all but inevitable. Above it all, it’s a film about devotion and family, driven by the highest stakes, underscored with equal measures of hope and violence. You will be transfixed." -Mitch Davis, Fantasia International Film Festival

    Buy Tickets Here

  • Co-Presented with Chicago Cinema Society!
    (2013, 115 min., video)
    Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

    METRO MANILA casts an illuminating gaze on the struggles of migrant families treading water amidst the dark underbelly of Filipino mean streets. It’s a riveting human drama and one of the most realistic and tense crime films in recent years. Oscar-nominated director/co-writer Sean Ellis (THE BROKEN), a U.K. national shooting on unfamiliar ground with the most uncanny naturalism and ease, pulls you intimately into his characters’ plights from the opening beats and never lets you go. His direction is perfect — and brilliantly put together — always one step ahead of the audience, twisting things off into places most unexpected with an agility that will amaze you. It’s phenomenal filmmaking." "It is a film that explores both the moral compromises forced by poverty and the cutthroat social dynamics that make bad choices all but inevitable. Above it all, it’s a film about devotion and family, driven by the highest stakes, underscored with equal measures of hope and violence. You will be transfixed." -Mitch Davis, Fantasia International Film Festival

    Buy Tickets Here

  • Chicago's Own Series
    Free!
    Saturday, October 18, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers - 5243 North Clark Street

    Our popular Open Screenings feature whatever walks in the door, so be sure to bring your work - insane comedies, touching dramas, high-energy music videos, odd animation, hot topic documentaries, neighborhood portraits, and any mind-expanding experimental visions. Maximum length per person is 20 minutes, and we will screen at least one film from everyone who brings work up to that time length. Accepted formats: DVD, Blu-ray or electronic files - family-friendly work only!

     

  • Guest Programmed by Erik Summerville!
    (1952-1989, approx. 60 min., 16mm)
    Saturday, October 25, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers - 5243 North Clark Street

     

    Whether it is done as a display of admiration, critical commentary, or satire mimesis has always been an integral part of the arts, and film—including animation—is certainly no exception. The following films represent a variety of artists’ attempts to, not emulate others in their own medium, but rather through animation channel the style of other mediums entirely, be it painting, dance, theatre, or a particular era or movement of art. BOCCIONI'S BIKE (1981, 8 minutes): an animation in the style of the Italian Futurists, by Skip Battaglia; Two Japanese wood block inspired shorts: Tony White’s homage to 19th Japanese artist Katsuhika Hokusai, HOKUSAI: A SKETCH DIARY (1978, 5.5 minutes), and THE BOY WHO DREW CATS (1988,4 minute); LAUTREC (1974, 6 minutes) —an attempt to bring the works of Toulousse-Lautrec to animated life; TRIANGLE (1989, 6 minutes): a reflection on Nazi persecution of gays during the holocaust through the style of German Expressionist painting; BROKEN-DOWN FILM (1985, 6 minutes): a nod to silent comedy, as well as an emulation of the wear and tear which occurs to film as a medium overtime; BEYOND KABUKI (1986, 10 minutes) —a stop motion interpretation of the titular style; CHAPTER 15 (1978, 7 minutes) —a mix of live-action and animation in tribute to sci-fi serials of the 30’s; and A PHANTASY (1952, 8 minutes): Norman McLaren’s ballet through abstract animation.

    Buy Tickets Here

  • Guest Programmed by Erik Summerville!
    (1952-1989, approx. 60 min., 16mm)
    Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

     

    Whether it is done as a display of admiration, critical commentary, or satire mimesis has always been an integral part of the arts, and film—including animation—is certainly no exception. The following films represent a variety of artists’ attempts to, not emulate others in their own medium, but rather through animation channel the style of other mediums entirely, be it painting, dance, theatre, or a particular era or movement of art. BOCCIONI'S BIKE (1981, 8 minutes): an animation in the style of the Italian Futurists, by Skip Battaglia; Two Japanese wood block inspired shorts: Tony White’s homage to 19th Japanese artist Katsuhika Hokusai, HOKUSAI: A SKETCH DIARY (1978, 5.5 minutes), and THE BOY WHO DREW CATS (1988,4 minute); LAUTREC (1974, 6 minutes) —an attempt to bring the works of Toulousse-Lautrec to animated life; TRIANGLE (1989, 6 minutes): a reflection on Nazi persecution of gays during the holocaust through the style of German Expressionist painting; BROKEN-DOWN FILM (1985, 6 minutes): a nod to silent comedy, as well as an emulation of the wear and tear which occurs to film as a medium overtime; BEYOND KABUKI (1986, 10 minutes) —a stop motion interpretation of the titular style; CHAPTER 15 (1978, 7 minutes) —a mix of live-action and animation in tribute to sci-fi serials of the 30’s; and A PHANTASY (1952, 8 minutes): Norman McLaren’s ballet through abstract animation.

    Buy Tickets Here

  • Filmmaker Stephen Cone in person Saturday!
    (2014, 60 min., video)
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers - 5243 North Clark Street

     

    Stephen Cone's (The Wise Kids, Black Box) THE MYSTERY OF LIFE is visually stripped bare, but overflows with allusion and plot and emotion and performance. It's a daring film that shows the core of Cone's art - the actor - stranded in front of a pale, unchanging background auditioning for the movie they're already in. The only interactions the actors have are with the occasional scene partner and "The Director" as a lawful benign Dr. Claw - offscreen even when he's standing right in front of the camera. Slowly multiple stories emerge that will graze and bounce off each other and perhaps resolve. Mothers and sons clash. Romantic partners flirt and rebuff. Gifts are given and re-sold. Sex acts are of the Warholian variety, both in action and framing. T.S. Eliot provides some text and the overarching philosophy. It's a square dance of actors trading roles and lines. Minimally absurdist in structure, but maximally forceful in execution; hyper-focused actors swimming within a narcotic construction - the frame as maddeningly confining fish tank. It's a sidelong tale with a traditional gut-punch saved for the last possible moment of this brief and powerful film.

    Buy Tickets Here