Screenings


Venues and Admissions

Please see listings for screening location information and admission prices.

Programming: Beckie Stocchetti

 

 

Upcoming Screenings

 

  • Directed by Russell Sheaffer
    2012, 88 minutes, Digital Projection
    Wednesday, September 3, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

     

    Chicago Filmmakers welcomes Bloomington, Indiana based filmmaker Russell Sheaffer, who will present his 2012 experimental documentary MASCULINITY/FEMININITY (88 min., Digital Projection).

     

    “Experimental filmmaker Russell Sheaffer's MASCULINITY/FEMININITY takes over where his short film starring James Franco, Masculinity & Me, left off. Shot mainly on super8 film, this is not a typical documentary. Sheaffer asks filmmakers, academics, gender theorists, and artists to present their concepts of gender construction in what works as a sort of performance piece rather than as full-on narrative. In fact, the filmmakers themselves question whether MASCULINITY/FEMININITY is scripted or not. Whether through monologue, visual art, performance art, or storytelling, individuals including B. Ruby Rich, Susan Stryker, Barbara Hammer, John Greyson, Chris Vargas and Yvonne Tasker represent the personal experiences they have had with gender-normative societal constructs. Each performance is unique, but somehow viewers will be able to see something of themselves in each one.” (Inside Out)

     

    Sheaffer in person at the Saturday screening only.

  • Filmmakers in Person!
    2008-14, approx. 97 minutes, Digital Projection
    Saturday, September 6, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    The centerpiece of this diverse program of locally-made shorts by Asian American artists is a special sneak preview of Eugene Sun Park’s film SELF-DEPORTATION: THE UNTOLD TALE OF A MARGINAL WOMAN (2014), which is a fiscal sponsor project at Chicago Filmmakers. Park’s experimental narrative is the story of a young Asian American woman who plans to return to her ancestral home after a traumatic event. First, though, she embarks on a bizarre farewell tour of a surrealistic “Real America.” Daniel Izui’s GAMAN – PORTRAITS OF CHICAGO NISEI WWII VETERANS (2012) is a compelling documentary that explores the experiences of six Japanese American World War II veterans, from before the war, through relocation and internment, the war itself, and the years following as they found their home in Chicago. Jason Matsumoto's documentary THE KANSHA PROJECT  follows a group of Chicago-based Japanese American students on a revelation filled journey to Manzanar--an American Japanese internment camp from WWII. (Monica Eng’s OBJECT OF MY AFFECTION (2013) and COMING HOME (2014) are narratives centered on romantic love and familial love respectively. The first is a romantic comedy about an unusual love affair; the second is the story of love and loss between a mother and son unfolding during her living funeral. Lydia Fu’s animated film PERMUTE (2008) depicts a young woman’s journey through a surrealist world fraught with mystery, anxiety, and apprehension. And her film PATRIARCHY (2014) is a vignette-style experimental work, combining live-action and animation, which uses the ideals and structures of patriarchy to turn the fathered social system on its head. (2008-14, approx. 90 min total, Digital Projection) 

    Buy Tickets Here! 

  • Self-Deportation
    2008-14, approx. 97 minutes, Digital Projection
    Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

     

    The centerpiece of this diverse program of locally-made shorts by Asian American artists is a special sneak preview of Eugene Sun Park’s film SELF-DEPORTATION: THE UNTOLD TALE OF A MARGINAL WOMAN (2014), which is a fiscal sponsor project at Chicago Filmmakers. Park’s experimental narrative is the story of a young Asian American woman who plans to return to her ancestral home after a traumatic event. First, though, she embarks on a bizarre farewell tour of a surrealistic “Real America.” Daniel Izui’s GAMAN – PORTRAITS OF CHICAGO NISEI WWII VETERANS (2012) is a compelling documentary that explores the experiences of six Japanese American World War II veterans, from before the war, through relocation and internment, the war itself, and the years following as they found their home in Chicago. Jason Matsumoto's documentary THE KANSHA PROJECT follows a group of Chicago-based Japanese American students on a revelation filled journey to Manzanar, an American Japanese internment camp from WWII. Monica Eng’s OBJECT OF MY AFFECTION (2013) and COMING HOME (2014) are narratives centered on romantic love and familial love respectively. The first is a romantic comedy about an unusual love affair; the second is the story of love and loss between a mother and son unfolding during her living funeral. Lydia Fu’s animated film PERMUTE (2008) depicts a young woman’s journey through a surrealist world fraught with mystery, anxiety, and apprehension. And her film PATRIARCHY (2014) is a vignette-style experimental work, combining live-action and animation, which uses the ideals and structures of patriarchy to turn the fathered social system on its head. (2008-14, approx. 97 min total, Digital Projection)

    Buy Tickets Here!

  • Cats on Film!
    1940s-60s, approx. 98 minutes, 16mm
    Friday, September 12, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

    The fascination with cats has been around long before YouTube. There was ancient Egypt, of course, but there was also the First International Cat Film Festival (INTERCAT '69), which took place at the Elgin Theater in NYC in December 1969. The brainchild of filmmaker Pola Chapelle, the festival brought together more than five hours of cat-related films. This program, showing in two parts and totaling roughly five hours, is something of a “best of” and includes work from the 1940s-1960s by both celebrated filmmakers and little-known artists. Included are OMA by Peter Knuppel, CATS by experimental animator Robert Breer, ENVY by Italian film legend Roberto Rossellini, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF A CAT by avant-garde film icon Maya Deren and her then-husband Alexander Hamid, the title sequence from WALK ON THE WILD SIDE by famed film credit designer Saul Bass, and FISHES IN SCREAMING WATER by Pola Chapelle. (1940s-60s, approx. 98 minutes)  Buy Tickets Here!

    This program is a follow-up to the popular Cat Film Festival, co-presented last year by Chicago Filmmakers and South Side Projections.  For details on the SSP screening (scheduled for July 24) visit http://southsideprojections.org/2014/06/very-fine-cats-indeed-more-experimental-feline-films-on-16mm/.

     

  • Cats on Film!
    1940s-60s, approx 98 min, 16mm
    Saturday, September 13, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    The fascination with cats has been around long before YouTube. There was ancient Egypt, of course, but there was also the First International Cat Film Festival (INTERCAT '69), which took place at the Elgin Theater in NYC in December 1969. The brainchild of filmmaker Pola Chapelle, the festival brought together more than five hours of cat-related films. This program, showing in two parts and totaling roughly five hours, is something of a “best of” and includes work from the 1940s-1960s by both celebrated filmmakers and little-known artists. Included are OMA by Peter Knuppel, CATS by experimental animator Robert Breer, ENVY by Italian film legend Roberto Rossellini, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF A CAT by avant-garde film icon Maya Deren and her then-husband Alexander Hamid, the title sequence from WALK ON THE WILD SIDE by famed film credit designer Saul Bass, and FISHES IN SCREAMING WATER by Pola Chapelle. (1940s-60s, approx. 98 minutes) 

    This program is a follow-up to the popular Cat Film Festival, co-presented last year by Chicago Filmmakers and South Side Projections.  For details on the SSP screening (scheduled for July 24) visit http://southsideprojections.org/2014/06/very-fine-cats-indeed-more-experimental-feline-films-on-16mm/.

  • Cats on Film!
    1940s-60s, approx. 98 minutes, 16mm
    Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

     

    The fascination with cats has been around long before YouTube. There was ancient Egypt, of course, but there was also the First International Cat Film Festival (INTERCAT '69), which took place at the Elgin Theater in NYC in December 1969. The brainchild of filmmaker Pola Chapelle, the festival brought together more than five hours of cat-related films. This program, showing in two parts and totaling roughly five hours, is something of a “best of” and includes work from the 1940s-1960s by both celebrated filmmakers and little-known artists. Included are OMA by Peter Knuppel, CATS by experimental animator Robert Breer, ENVY by Italian film legend Roberto Rossellini, THE PRIVATE LIFE OF A CAT by avant-garde film icon Maya Deren and her then-husband Alexander Hamid, the title sequence from WALK ON THE WILD SIDE by famed film credit designer Saul Bass, and FISHES IN SCREAMING WATER by Pola Chapelle. (1940s-60s, approx. 98 minutes, 16mm)

    Buy Tickets Here! 

    This program is a follow-up to the popular Cat Film Festival, co-presented last year by Chicago Filmmakers and South Side Projections.  For details on the SSP screening (scheduled for July 24) visit http://southsideprojections.org/2014/06/very-fine-cats-indeed-more-experimental-feline-films-on-16mm/.

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Friday, September 26, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde

     

    Buy Tickets Here!

     

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Saturday, September 27, 2014 - 8:00pm
    Location: Chicago Filmmakers

     

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde



    Buy Tickets Here! 

  • Chicago Premiere! Never Before Released in the U.S.!
    1996, 106 minutes, Video Projection
    Wednesday, October 1, 2014 - 6:30pm
    Location: Columbia College Chicago - Hokin Hall | 623 S. Wabash, room 109

    A woman (Laura), a computer, an invisible interlocutor: such is the setup on which LEVEL FIVE is built. Laura "inherits" a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa - a tragedy practically unknown in the West, but whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy, until they start to interfere with her own life. (1996, 106 min., Video Projection)


    “Too complicated for words – yet unforgettable – Chris Marker signs a masterful historic-fantastic thriller, a vital reflection on death and image... A film on memory and the refusal to forget. An unforgettable film.” —Pierre Murat, Telerama

    “An exceptional film!” —Jean-Michel Frodon, Le Monde

     

    Buy Tickets Here! 

     

     

     

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